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Our exile is deep.

There are exiles which are physical.  They require us to change our location or decide in a different sort of path or action.  However, there are exiles that are so deeply engrained in our psyche and our metaphysical subconscious that it is as if we are asleep.

We are so asleep we really don’t realize it.  It is this slumber in which we find ourselves in that we have only one way out.

A story.

On Purim we read the Megillah in order to experience the story that begins to arouse – to awaken our soul to drive us to finish our “journey” home – within. But it is Pesach that wakes us up, because Pesach is our story of leaving Mitzrayim – not leaving 3,500 years ago, but leaving Mitzrayim now.

Mitzrayim is the exile of constricted God consciousness.  It is this reason that it is the archetype for all exiles, because exile – real exile does not flow from a physical source, but rather a spiritual place that expresses itself in physical ways.

Our exile is an inner one.  We live in a world of constricted awareness.  A result of being bombarded by self centered desires and an a-moralistic consumerism, whose goal is to bury God within a world flooded by ambient information.

On Pesach night, Reb Noson teaches that we can awaken from this sleep and transition back to who we really are deep inside, but we must first realize that we are still in captivity. Then the story of leaving Mitzrayim – the most ancient of stories where our collective soul is held in the mivtzar, the fortress of Mitzrayim and is ultimately set free, will set us free also.

In many ways each of our souls are still being held captive waiting to be released in order to fulfill their task in this world.  The Haggadah is the tool to awaken us and set our souls free once and for all.

Are we listening?

(Based on Likutey Moharan 60; Likutey Halachot Hilchot Nedarim Halacha 5)

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Author

David Mark or "Reb Dovid" as many call him is a prolific writer and informal educator, focusing on the merger of Chassidic thought and the Land of Israel. He received his rabbinic ordination from Rabbi Brovender and Rabbi Nechemia Goldberg. He is currently one of the writers and editors at Breslov Research Institute. He teaches Breslov Chassidus in the American program in the Hesder Yeshiva of Otniel as well as in various settings in Jerusalem and the wider Judea and Samaria area.

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